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By Subject - Literature
TitleAuthorDescription
After InnocenceTerry OttenOtten discusses the continuing viability of the myth of the Fall in literature. He relates a wide variety of romantic and modern works to fundamental issues in modern Christianity.

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Approaches to UlyssesThomas StaleyScholars of James Joyce offer critical analysis of his work Ulysses. Five essays interpret the character of the novel; four deal with the literary style of presentation, the last focuses on the problems of translation.

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Composition of Tender is the NightMatthew BruccoliBruccoli reconstructs seventeen drafts and three versions of the novel to answer questions about F. Scott Fitzgerald’s major work that have long puzzled critics of modern literature.

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Dylan Thomas’ Early ProseAnnis PrattThis first full-scale treatment of the early prose of Dylan Thomas demonstrates the unity of his total work. Pratt argues that the inward journey of the poetic imagination which is implicit in poetry is often explicit in prose. Her study of Thomas’ early prose alongside his early poetry helps to elucidate all of his writing.

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Emily Dickinson’s Reception in the 1890sWillis BuckinghamThis work reprint, annotates, and indexes virtually all mention of Emily Dickinson in the first decade of her publication, tripling the known references to the poet during the nineties. Much of this material, drawn from scrapbboks of clippings, rare journals, and crumbling newspapers, was on teh verge of extinction.

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Empty GardenAshraf RushdyBy analyzing Paradise Regained and Samson Agonistes, Ashraf H. A. Rushdy redefines Milton’s creative spirit in a way that encompasses his poetic, political, and religious careers.

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Fiction and Criticism of Katherine Anne PorterHarry John Mooney JrOne of the earliest, and still one of the most perceptive analyses of Katherine Anne Porter, it gives careful interpretation of the style and intent of Porter’s work from 1935 through the publication and critical reception of Ship of Fools.

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Fire and IronRichard AllenWritten in Iceland by an unknown author about 1280, Njáls saga has been called the greatest work of vernacular prose fiction from the European Middle Ages. Allen's finely written and perceptive study is one of the first in English to offer a critical examination of the text.

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Gift of the UnicornPercival HuntThe ability to write well is difficult to gain. To write beyond the ordinary—beyond the clear and effective paragraph or book—needs craft, patience, and practice. And it has always required something more: genius, magic, a supreme gift. Professor Hunt in The Gift of the Unicorn binds the two—the craft and the gift—under a unifying light, showing both writer and reader the how and why and perhaps of good writing and of the writing that has gained, in Hunt’s words, “the friendship of time” and is called literature.

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Grand ContinuumDavid WhiteWhite examines key passages in James Joyce’s novels both as a philosopher and as literary critic. He develops a thesis that Joyce’s attempt to capture the mysterious process whereby perception and consciousness are translated into language entails a fundamental challenge to everyday notions of reality.

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Great SuccessionRobert Emmet LongThe first book devoted to the literary relationship between Henry James and his American predecessor, Nathaniel Hawthorne.

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Hole in the FabricStrother PurdyPurdy draws on the work of Kurt Vonnegut, Vladimir Nabokov, Alain Robbe-Grillet, Günter Grass, Samuel Becket, and Eugene Ionesco to examine ways in which novelists explore the unknown. He considers Henry James in conjunction with these novelists, and with scientific discoveries and advances—black holes, hydrogen bombs, space travel—to offer new insights into James’s work and into the twentieth-century view of humanity’s place in the world.

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James Gould CozzensHarry John Mooney JrMooney closely examines each of Cozzens’ novels, isolating and defining his main themes and addressing the critical acclaim and condemnation of his works.

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Joyce CaryCharles HoffmannAn examination of the writings of novelist Joyce Cary, and the many influences on his life and work.

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Levi's VindicationKenneth StowStow preesnts a critical review of the “1007 Anonymous”, a fictional story of murderous attack and forced conversion known as “The Terrible Event of the Year 1007.” Stow’s historical analysis shows the story to be untrue, thereby vindicating French scholar Israel Levi, who first demonstrated the falsehood of the account, although he was largely ignored.
Making Up SocietyPhilip FisherFisher places the work of George Eliot within the great evolution that constitutes the nineteenth-century English novel. He reports not only about her work, but about an evolving complex literary form.

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Metafictional MuseLarry McCafferyMcCaffery interprets the works of three major writers of radically experimental fiction: Robert Coover; Donald Barthelme; and Willam H. Gass.

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Mind of WinterWilliam BevisBevis examines the most puzzling and least studied aspect of Wallace Stevens’ poetry: detachment.

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Nathaniel HawthorneRaymona HullA study of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s writing and life during his time as United States consul in Liverpool, England (1853–1864), his final years.

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Poet-PhysicianDonald GoellnichtA challenging reappraisal of Keats’ work, showing the distinct influence of six years of medical training in his writings.

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Pseudonyms of Christ in the Modern NovelEdwin MoseleyAn interpretation of the recurrence of the Christ archetype in the modern novel. Moseley discusses novelists from Conrad and Turgenev to Camus and Hemingway.

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Richard WrightRussell BrignanoThe first book-length study of Richard Wright (1908–1960) gives a critical, historical, and biographical perspective on the gifted African American writer.

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Robinson JeffersMercedes MonjianIn addition to discussing Robinson Jeffers’ life and philosophy, Monjian analyzes the form and style of his poetry and philosophy of inhumanism.

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Ruins and EmpireLaurence GoldsteinOne of the most common scenes in Augustan and Romantic literature is that of a writer confronting some emblem of change and loss, most often the remains of a vanished civilization or a desolate natural landscape. Ruins and Empire traces the ruin sentiment from its earliest classical and Renaissance expressions through English literature to its establishment as a dominant theme of early American art.

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Samuel Pepys in the DiaryPercival HuntIn this work, the reader experiences the life of Samuel Pepys and his freinds, great and small, in seventeenth-century London. We see great men of war, business and letters, enhanced by Percival Hunt’s comprehensive bibliography.

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Shapeless GodHarry John Mooney JrNine noted literary critics examine the spiritual and religious elements in the fiction of such diverse writers as James Baldwin, J. F. Powers, Graham Greene, Par Lagerkvist, and Flannery O’Connor.

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Short Stories of Ambrose BierceStuart WoodruffIn this pioneering study of Ambrose Bierce’s stories, Woodruff examines the best and worst of his fiction and traces the causes of Bierce’s success and failure as a writer, analyzing his inability to reconcile the extremes of temperament and belief that marked his life and give his stories their characteristic form.

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War of TitansJackie DiSalvoIn a dramatically original analysis, Jackie DiSalvo explores Blake’s reworking of Genesis and Paradise Lost in his prophetic poem The Four Zoas, creating a compelling new reading of both Milton and Blake. With informed argument and provocative insights, DiSalvo shows how Blake’s view of history prefigures the revaluation of our own myths of origin prompted by new political, psychological, and feminist perspectives.

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Wild Man WithinEdward DudleyThese essays trace the myth of the wild man from the Middle Ages to its disintegration into symbol in the periods following the discovery of America and encounter with real “wild men.” This is the first book to discuss the concept of wildness in the writings of the Enlightenment period in Western Europe.

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