Browse | News & Events | Ordering | UPP Blog | For Authors | For Instructors | Prizes | Rights & Permissions | Hebrew Union College Press | About the Press | Support the Press | Contact Us
November 2002
256 pages  

6 x 9
9780822958215
Paper $27.95 Add to cart

View Cart
Check Out
Other Ways to order
Seeing Reds
Federal Surveillance of Radicals in the Pittsburgh Mill District, 1917–1921
McCormick, Charles
Charles McCormick’s extensively researched work describes the formative period of federal domestic spying in the Pittsburgh region. He utilizes case files from various federal intelligence agencies to add to our understanding of the security state, cold war ideology, labor and immigration history, and the rise of the authoritarian American Left, as well as the career paths of figures as diverse as J. Edgar Hoover and William Z. Foster.

View the Digital Edition
Charles H. McCormick is professor emeritus of history at Fairmont State College. He is the author of Leisler's Rebellion, 1689-1691, and This Nest of Vipers: McCarthyism and Higher Education in West Virginia, 1951-1952.
“McCormick's well-written and researched study is not only a valuable addition to the literature on Pittsburgh radical and labor politics during the World War I and Red Scare eras, but is as well an important contribution to the literature on the World War I era, the Red Scare, labor and radical history, and federal surveillance (FBI) policy and history.”—Athan Theoharis

“A well-crafted exploration of the course and impact of the First Red Scare . . . Stands out as both an example of the thorough use of sources and an original stylistic approach to writing history. . . . A valuable exploration of an often overlooked period in American history.”—Shae Davidson, West Virginia History, 2001-03

"McCormick's broadly researched, meticulously documented, yet compact monograph analyzes federal 'efforts to define, understand and suppress leftists' during World War I and the Red Scare. . . . Fills a significant void in the historiography of U.S. governmental suppression." —American Historical Review

"A valuable look at the inner workings of the federal domestic intelligence operations during a formative period." —Ohio History

"An excellent case-study on how and why the red scare occurred, with Pittsburgh as [the] focal point. . . . Informative and compelling reading." —Historian

Complete Description Reviews
History/US
close 

During World War I, fear that a network of German spies was operating on American soil justified the rapid growth of federal intelligence agencies. When that threat proved illusory, these agencies, staffed heavily by corporate managers and anti-union private detectives, targeted antiwar and radical labor groups, particularly the Socialist party and the Industrial Workers of the World. Seeing Reds, based largely on case files from the Bureau of Investigation, Military Intelligence Division, and Office of Naval Intelligence, describes this formative period of federal domestic spying in the Pittsburgh region. McCormick traces the activities of L. M. Wendell, a Bureau of Investigation “special employee” who infiltrated the IWW’s Pittsburgh recruiting branch and the inner circle of anarchist agitator and lawyer Jacob Margolis. Wendell and other Pittsbugh based agents spied on radical organizations from Erie, Pennsylvania, to Camp Lee, Virginia, intervened in the steel and coal strikes of 1919, and carried out the Palmer raids aimed at mass deportation of members of the Union of Russian Workers and the New Communist Party. McCormick’s detailed history uses extensive research to add to our understanding of the security state, cold war ideology, labor and immigration history, and the rise of the authoritarian American Left, as well as the career paths of figures as diverse as J. Edgar Hoover and William Z. Foster.
close 
close 


close 

© 2017 University of Pittsburgh Press. All rights reserved.