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January 1979
352 pages  

5 1/2 x 8
9780822953104
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The Homestead Strike of 1892
Burgoyne, Arthur
In 1893 Arthur Burgoyne, one of Pittsburgh’s most skilled and sensitive journalists, published Homestead, a complete history of the 1892 Homestead strike and the ensuing conflict between the Carnegie Steel Company and the Amalgamated Association of Iron and Steel Workers. Accurate, readable, and judiciously balanced in assigning blame, this work gives crucial insight into a turbulent period in Pittsburgh’s history.

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“This book, which has been too long out-of-print, is rich with portraits of industrial and political leaders. It is especially vivid in its use of the workers' testimony given at the time of their trials; it provides an outstanding summarization of their cause.”—Pennsylvania History

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The violent events of 1892 during the Homestead strike stand together as one of the great dramatic moments in American labor history. The armed battle between the 300 Pinkerton detectives hired by the Carnegie Steel Company and the Amalagamated Association of Iron and Steel Workers resulted in great loss of life and injury on both sides. But it had even more far-reaching consequences. The failure of the strike directly prepared the way for two generations of repressive politics and substandard working and living conditions in the steel towns. And the international attention it commanded resulted in a tide of criticism from congressmen and journalists of such business leaders as Henry Clay Frick and Andrew Carnegie. In 1893 Arthur Burgoyne, one of Pittsburgh’s most skilled and sensitive journalists, published Homestead, a complete history of the strike. Providing dramatic eyewitness accounts, the book is an accurate and extraordinarily readable narrative. It is rich with portraits of industrial and political leaders, is judiciously balanced in assigning blame in specific episodes, and uses trial records as an eloquent summary of the workers’ rights. This new edition, published under a new title, is heavily illustrated with period pictures and is enhanced by a carefully developed and interpretive afterword by David Demarest, Associate Professor of English at Carnegie-Mellon University.
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